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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the same as in other large cities -- investors discover a derelict district not far from the city and renovate it. then they raise the prices. >> the financial crisis has made it worse. people invest in property. real-estate prices have never gone down here, so it has always been a good investment. >> the center gave in to appeals for cheaper housing and entered into an alliance for living. 6000 flats are to be built. 1/3 is low-income housing. with the population growing by 12,000 people a year, will that be enough? >> it should be enough because we will not stop building. it is not a four-year manifesto. it is for the whole time. >> all this comes too late for this woman who spends her entire income of 400 euros on rent, but she is still happy to have a room after so much searching. the time of uncertainty is over. >> i packed a bag, left my things at friends and acquaintances, and had to look for a sofa or bed to sleep on every night. i did not have a permanent place to sleep. i had to move from sofa to sofa >> many students and trainees have to commute. they stay with their pa
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
army is trying to organize the tent city, but they lack the money, experience, and personnel to take care of such a large group of people. >> from morning at 7:00 evening, this is for five people, for a family. >> he is living with his family of 17 in an old tent. >> the rain was terrible. everything -- really everything got wet. even our mattresses. hopefully, my children will not get sick, too. >> basil is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border.
government figures, among the authority figures, and among society at large. >> afghan war victims have filed a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german def
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred thousand, which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that were excluded from
began. and a large community. a significant figure at that time given the population of the city. in poland this survive in all kinds of ways. many people survived by going to the soviet union command many people come home to find what is left to see what kind of live they made. one very bad and moving document can last many come home just to see the cemeteries and leave because they don't wanta be there anymore. but they come back. some try and make new lives there. some join the communist parties. the communist party as an attraction for -- a buddy who has experienced the devastation of the war, the shattering of all ethics and all morales lehigh, many people did see in communism a kind of alternative. there was a time, a very brief time when some people so they come back. and some really camino, it's a strange and cards started tell because sums on the communist party and some immediately come into conflict with the communist party because a lot of them are small traders are merchants.the. they then begin to be large groups. help train qc will fight for independence and palest
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
a large photo. but to run up and down the state to ocean city we had a four-lane bridge and we just replaced it. the old bridge is gone. it is amazing. five months ago we were using that bridge. as a major link. we experience widespread storm damage. we continue to work with officials to see the extent of our losses. preliminary assessments from connecticut and new jersey jersey, this will sound modest but we need between 7.5 and $9 million. for preparation, response and prepares. fish and wildlife service and army corps still has their own assessments but they tell us it will be tens of millions of dollars for repairs. this seems like a small number but with the state budget they will need assistance through fema. if an ounce of prevention is worth it is we must mitigate the effect of future storms. this is the recurring theme especially is climate change increases the severity of the coastal storm. the army corpshas built extra projects and in delaware and down the east coast in no small part to the separates they performed exceptionally well with billions of dollars of damages ri
known, particularly in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred , which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that
looking at large, destructive tornadoes. that's why we are concerned about. look at this temperature right here, 9 degrees in omaha, 24 in oklahoma city. the temps plumb it behind the storm and we still watch the severe weather pull off to the south. we will be dealing with blizzard conditions across parts of missouri. i want to show you this bulls sigh for the threat for severe weather. texas, louisiana, mississippi and alabama. unfortunately on christmas you need to have your plans in place if you need to take carve within moments. kelly: that is very important. good job on fox & friends this morning. you are my favorite weatherman. merry christmas to you. >> reporter: and to you. jaime: the tsunamis are really the only thing they have to worry about generally when it comes to wild weather in hawaii and that is not a concern. president obama is there spending time with his family for the holiday and yesterday he went golfing before heading to the beach with the first lady and their daughters. aides say the president will have to return to washington in a day or two to deal with you know
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)